DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Author: Jeff Starr

Easy Custom Feeds in WordPress

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Now that we have seen how to setup Tumblr-style posts, it would be nice to be able to segregate the Tumblr-posts category from the main feed into its own, separate feed. This would enable readers to subscribe exclusively to the Tumblr-posts feed and maybe display it in their sidebar or something. While we’re at it, it would also be cool to be able to provide readers with a full menu of feed choices, including the following:

Including WordPress’ comment-reply.js (the right way)

Web developer and WordPress enthusiast Peter Wilson explains an improved method for including WordPress’ comment-reply.js. His method “checks if the visitor is browsing either a page or a post, if comments are open for the entry, and finally, if threaded comments are enabled. If all of these conditions are met, the JavaScript required for threaded comments is added.”

Serve IE6 Visitors the Default WordPress Theme

Nathan Rice shares an clever technique to serve your IE6 visitors the Default WordPress theme (or any theme, for that matter). He even wraps it all up into a nice plugin that you can use for your site. I think this is a good middle-ground between completely ignoring IE6 and breaking your back trying to accommodate it. You could even design an "all-purpose" theme for IE6 to streamline new site development. Drag, drop and done.

How to Display a Copyright as a Range of Dates

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Technically, your work is protected under copyright “the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.” [1] Registration of your copyrighted work is not required [2], but you should include a copyright notice on all published works [3].

Definitive Guide to WordPress Post/Page Navigation

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There are many ways to navigate a WordPress-powered site. There are archive links, category links, page links, internal post links, single post links, admin comment links, tag links, and many other types of navigational links. When it comes to navigating sequentially through your site’s chronological archive pages, category archives, and other types of archive pages, WordPress provides several useful template tags designed to dynamically link the pages together. Likewise, for single permalink post-views, WordPress provides a set of template tags that connects the pages together in chronologically sequential fashion.

Advanced WordPress Targeting with body_class_plus()

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Since WordPress 2.8, we can target specific types of page views with CSS using the new body_class() tag. Designed for use within the <body></body> element, body_class() outputs various class attributes according to the current type of page view. This makes it easy to apply page-specific styling such as current-page navigation highlighting and other nifty CSS tricks.

DiW Now Featured at Planet WordPress

We’re happy to announce that Digging into WordPress is now featured at Ozh’ Planet WordPress! Planet WordPress is an incredible WordPress resource, bringing together some of the Web’s finest WordPress contributors, plugin developers, and theme designers. The Planet WordPress feed currently features nearly 50 hand-selected WordPress bloggers and aggregates their syndicated content every two hours. As proclaimed at the site, Planet WordPress is “The Epicenter of Everything WordPress” — definitely a great way to stay current with the wonderful world of WordPress.

How to Use WordPress Revisions to Go Back in Time

By default, all your Posts and Pages save revisions of themselves as you are writing them and editing them. This can really save your butt if you accidentally change or delete something you shouldn't have and have no other copy. This is a quick overview of how to use this powerful feature of WordPress.

Update: (404 link removed 2014/10/22)

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

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Recently, I found myself on the front lines of WordPress’ somewhat complicated Media-Library system. The site that I was developing required a rather elaborate system of retrieving and displaying image attachments. So, using the latest version of WordPress (2.8.3 at the time), I found myself experimenting with as many template tags and custom functions as I could find. After much experimentation, I discovered the perfect solution, and along the way I collected a healthy collection of recipes for displaying image attachments and their various types of associated information.

Show Off Your WordPress Database Statistics

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Did you know that WordPress makes it super-easy to display some basic statistics about your database performance? The information may be displayed publicly on your web page, slightly hidden in your source code, or entirely private so only you can see it. There are two basic statistics that are drop-dead easy to include on your pages:

Goodbye Dolly? (Take the poll!)

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Out of the thousands of plugins available for WordPress, there is one that all WordPress users are familiar with: Hello Dolly. As far as I know, the Hello Dolly plugin was the first WordPress plugin and has been included with every version of WordPress. The plugin is so familiar that many WordPress users don’t even think about it. They either activate the plugin or delete it without giving it a second thought. But if you actually stop to think about it for a moment, the following questions seem inescapable:

Code is poetry