by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Category: Theme

4 Ways to Loop with WordPress

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At the heart of the WordPress theme template is the venerable WordPress loop. When you're looking at your index.php file, for example, the loop is the part that typically begins with if(have_posts()) and contains all the tags and markup used to generate the page. The default loop works perfectly well for most single-loop themes, but for more advanced designs with stuff like multiple and custom loops, more looping power is needed. Fortunately, WordPress provides plenty of flexibility with four ways to loop:

ALL AJAX Theme Update

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One of the themes that is an exclusive download to all you good-looking people that purchased The Book is the ALL AJAX theme. The idea behind it is that the page never1 reloads. Whenever an "internal" link is clicked, the main content area replaces itself with content that is fetched via Ajax.

Using Google Custom Search in WordPress

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Once a WordPress powered site starts getting quite a bit of content, the default built-in search becomes fairly useless. It just isn't very smart. If you wrote a comprehensive article about He-Man, but since have written five other articles that just mentioned He-Man in passing, a search for "He-Man" will turn up your comprehensive article sixth. There have been various tweaks and plugins and whatnot to try and make this better. But why not leverage the best search engine ever written instead?

The “Frameworks” Discussion

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I've never been a big fan of "theme frameworks." I quite like hacking up WordPress myself and making it do the things I want it to do. I feel like most theme frameworks have a ton of custom functions for you to "help" in doing that kind of stuff. For example, adding a block of text to the sidebar, adjusting the layout, or building a custom menu.

WordPress Custom functions.php Template, Part 2

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In a recent post, we show you how to clean up and enhance the functionality of WordPress with a custom functions.php template. In that post, we explain how using a custom functions.php template can speed up development while optimizing many key aspects of WordPress. In this post, we deliver another prime collection of 15 custom functions to enhance your WordPress site. These functions provide all sorts of useful functionality, including stuff like:

WordPress functions.php Template with 15 Essential Custom Functions

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When designing WordPress themes, I always add a common set of custom functions to the theme’s functions.php file. This speeds up development time because I don’t have to hunt for and individually copy the same slew of functions for every theme. I just drop in a copy of my functions.php template and build up from there. This takes care of all those little things that always need to be done:

BLANK WordPress Theme

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There are many like it, but this one is mine.

I have a "blank" WordPress theme for myself, because I make a lot of WordPress themes. Starting from Kubrick, or any other pre-made theme, would be absurd. There is to much stuff there that would to be stripped out or fought against to be useful. So, I have my own. It's been in a folder called BLANK-theme on my computer for a while, so I'm going to call it BLANK. And now I'm making it available for you. Read on to find out the scoop on it and you can decide if it would be of any use to you.

How to Widgetize Your WordPress Theme in 2 Steps

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Working on a new theme for the next Digging into WordPress book update, I found myself really getting into the whole “widgetizing” thing. Widgets enable non-technical users to customize your theme according to their specific layout needs, and with so many different widgets available, the possibilities are endless. You may have thought about widgets as something you do in the sidebar, but there is no reason to stop there. You can widgetize just about every part of your theme. In this post, we’ll show you how to do widgetize your theme in two easy steps. Once we get the basics down, we’ll dig into some sweet tips and tricks.

WordPress “more” Tag Tricks

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Our personal collection of useful ways to customize and format the WordPress more tag...

Everyone who has been using WordPress for any length of time should be familiar with the < !--more--> tag. When you are writing a post, inserting the < !--more--> tag within the post text will create an excerpt out of any text/markup that precedes it. The post will then show the default “more...” link that readers may click to view the entire post. When the more tag is used, the post’s excerpt will be displayed on all non-single views, such as category, tag, and archive views; the entire post content will only be displayed when the single-post view is displayed. Let’s look at a quick example..

How to Develop WordPress Themes Behind the Scenes

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A reader recently asked about how to develop a theme on a live site such that:

  • All visitors will see the current theme
  • Only the designer will see the new theme
  • All site plugins will work with the new theme
  • Smooth transition between old and new theme at launch

These are the main concerns, but there are a few other details that need addressed to ensure smooth theme development on a live site. Let’s take a look at how to achieve these goals and effectively develop themes behind the scenes..

Code is poetry