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3 Ways to Reset the WordPress Loop

3 Ways to Reset the WordPress Loop

WordPress does an excellent job of keeping track of what's happening with the loop, but once you start customizing parameters and setting up multiple loops, it's a good idea to explicitly reset them using one of three WordPress template tags. In this DigWP post, we'll explore each of these three loop-reset techniques to get a better understanding of when and how to use them in your WordPress themes.

Fun Edit Posts Link (✍)

Fun Edit Posts Link (✍)

Tiny little fun idea by Dave Rupert.

4 Ways to Loop with WordPress

4 Ways to Loop with WordPress

At the heart of the WordPress theme template is the venerable WordPress loop. When you're looking at your index.php file, for example, the loop is the part that typically begins with if(have_posts()) and contains all the tags and markup used to generate the page. The default loop works perfectly well for most single-loop themes, but for more advanced designs with stuff like multiple and custom loops, more looping power is needed. Fortunately, WordPress provides plenty of flexibility with four ways to loop:

Custom Login / Register / Password Code

Custom Login / Register / Password Code

In this DigWP post, we transform three slices of code into a clean & stylish tabbed menu that visitors can use to login, register, and recover passwords from anywhere on your site.

There are too many features and details to explain up front, so take a moment to check out the working demo to see the finished product.

ALL AJAX Theme Update

ALL AJAX Theme Update

One of the themes that is an exclusive download to all you good-looking people that purchased The Book is the All AJAX theme. The idea behind it is that the page never1 reloads. Whenever an "internal" link is clicked, the main content area replaces itself with content that is fetched via Ajax. So posts, pages, search results, and everything else loads right there on the same page. This gives your visitors a smooth, "app-like" experience.

Using Google Custom Search in WordPress

Using Google Custom Search in WordPress

Once a WordPress powered site starts getting quite a bit of content, the default built-in search becomes fairly useless. It just isn't very smart. If you wrote a comprehensive article about He-Man, but since have written five other articles that just mentioned He-Man in passing, a search for "He-Man" will turn up your comprehensive article sixth. There have been various tweaks and plugins and whatnot that attempt to improve upon this default functionality. But why not leverage the best search engine ever written instead?

WordPress 3 Template Hierarchy

WordPress 3 Template Hierarchy

This chart is one entire page in our book, but I thought it would be good to focus on specifically. Template hierarchy has gotten a bit more advanced since the last time we covered it.

The idea is that WordPress will look for files in a theme to use to render the current page in a specific order. For example, let say you have a page for showing posts from a certain category like this. On this site, all our category pages are currently the same and use "archive.php" template. This file is pretty far down the hierarchy, and is shared with other types of views, for example, tag and category pages.

The “Frameworks” Discussion

The “Frameworks” Discussion

I've never been a big fan of "theme frameworks." I quite like hacking up WordPress myself and making it do the things I want it to do. I feel like most theme frameworks have a ton of custom functions for you to "help" in doing that kind of stuff. For example, adding a block of text to the sidebar, adjusting the layout, or building a custom menu.

WordPress Custom functions.php Template, Part 2

WordPress Custom functions.php Template, Part 2

In a recent post, we show you how to clean up and enhance the functionality of WordPress with a custom functions.php template. In that post, we explain how using a custom functions.php template can speed up development while optimizing many key aspects of WordPress. In this post, we deliver another prime collection of 15 custom functions to enhance your WordPress site. These functions provide all sorts of useful functionality, including stuff like:

WordPress functions.php Template with 15 Essential Custom Functions

WordPress functions.php Template with 15 Essential Custom Functions

When designing WordPress themes, I always add a common set of custom functions to the theme’s functions.php file. This speeds up development time because I don’t have to hunt for and individually copy the same slew of functions for every theme. I just drop in a copy of my functions.php template and build up from there. This takes care of all those little things that always need to be done for every theme. You know, things like:

Custom Comments HTML Output

Custom Comments HTML Output

With WordPress, displaying all the comments on a Post or Page is incredibly easy. In your theme's single.php file you probably have a line like this:

Which Template File does WordPress Use to Render Different Pages?

Which Template File does WordPress Use to Render Different Pages?

This page in the codex has a particularly interesting infographic that shows a flowchart of how WordPress chooses which template file it is going to use to render the page. For example, did you know if you have a published page with "contact" as the slug, it will look for and use page-contact.php automatically?

BLANK WordPress Theme

BLANK WordPress Theme

There are many like it, but this one is mine.

I have a "blank" WordPress theme for myself, because I make a lot of WordPress themes. Starting from Kubrick, or any other pre-made theme, would be absurd. There is to much stuff there that would to be stripped out or fought against to be useful.

So, I have my own starter theme. It's been in a folder called BLANK-theme on my computer for a while, so I'm going to call it BLANK. And now I'm making it available for you. Read on to find out the scoop on it and you can decide if it would be of any use to you.

How to Widgetize Your WordPress Theme in 2 Steps

How to Widgetize Your WordPress Theme in 2 Steps

Working on a new theme for the next Digging into WordPress book update, I found myself really getting into the whole “widgetizing” thing. Widgets enable non-technical users to customize your theme according to their specific layout needs, and with so many different widgets available, the possibilities are endless. You may have thought about widgets as something you do in the sidebar, but there is no reason to stop there. You can widgetize just about every part of your theme. In this post, we’ll show you how to do widgetize your theme in two easy steps. Once we get the basics down, we’ll dig into some sweet tips and tricks.

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