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Attach Unattached Media Files

Attach Unattached Media Files

Attaching any unattached media files that you may have floating around is a good way to keep things organized and running smooth. Normally, when you're working on a post in the Edit Post screen, you click the Upload/Insert button and use the nifty drag-n-drop media uploader to get 'er done. When you upload your media files in this manner, WordPress "knows" that you want to attach the file to that particular post. Super straightforward sure, but there are situations where WordPress doesn't know which post to use. In this DigWP post, we walk through the process of finding unattached media files and attaching them to their respective posts.

Measuring Latency with Apache Bench

Measuring Latency with Apache Bench

One of the important factors in the speed of your site is the distance between your servers and the browser visiting your site. The time it takes the information to travel from the server to the browser is called latency. Latency increases with distance, so no matter how fast your servers may be, high latency can make your site load slowly for visitors who are geographically removed from your servers.

WordPress Smarter Slugs ~!@$%^&*()={}[]?

WordPress Smarter Slugs ~!@$%^&*()={}<>[]?

See those crazy characters in the title of this post? Now see how they don't appear in the post's URL? That's one of the finer details of the WordPress 3.3 update: smarter permalink slugs.

Goodbye Admin Bar, Hello Toolbar

Goodbye Admin Bar, Hello Toolbar

When the Admin Bar hit the streets in WordPress 3.1, people seemed to either love it or hate it. And rightly so, it was a significant change in the appearance of the WP Admin area, and if not disabled in your User Profile, the front-end of your site as well. Many tips, tricks and plugins for customizing the Admin Bar began appearing around the Web. And then just as the dust began to settle, BAM — the "Admin Bar" transforms into the "Toolbar" with the WP 3.3 update.

Where to Get Help with WordPress

Where to Get Help with WordPress

As a popular WordPress resource, we get quite a few requests for 1-to-1 WordPress support, but unfortunately don't have the resources to help everyone directly. We would love to help everyone out with specific questions and technical support, but really it's just a matter of time that's required for our own work, etc. So as you might suspect, we frequently see emails like look like this:

Clean Up Weird Characters in Database

Clean Up Weird Characters in Database

It's been a crazy month, with lots of drama all over the place. Here at DigWP.com, we had an episode where the site was all screwed up and not loading or only partially loading, blank white pages, and the whole bit. During the process of keeping it together and trying to restore full functionality, numerous database imports and exports were performed under a variety of circumstance. During the rush, apparently the most recent database backup file was somehow uncompressed outside of MySQL before final import.

Several days later, that decompression/unzipping basically converted every quotation mark, em dash, en dash, ellipses and other special characters into some really ugly-looking codes.

So really, don’t use just %postname% as your permalink structure.

So really, don’t use just %postname% as your permalink structure.

Update: This issue is FIXED in WordPress 3.3.

Here's the really short version:

I used /%postname%/ as my permalink structure on CSS-Tricks for a long time. I have lots of Pages. My site went down. I changed my permalink structure to begin with a number. Now it's fine.

Leave the Visual Editor ON

Leave the Visual Editor ON

Just a quick reminder to anyone out there that may not know.. Enabling the Visual Editor in your User Profile settings gets you access to both Visual and HTML editors in the Write/Edit Post screen. Just click on either tab above the toolbar to toggle between modes. So you can write your posts in HTML and then jump into the Visual Editor to take advantage of the new Linking tool, which makes adding links incredibly easy. Read on to learn more about linking with the WordPress Visual Editor..

Poll: Best Caching Plugin for WordPress?

Poll: Best Caching Plugin for WordPress?

New Poll! We've got several polls running in the sidebar at DigWP.com, and the latest asks which caching plugin is best. Sure it's all anecdotal and subjective, but user feedback is a fun way to see trends and get an idea of the top plugins.

WordPress Admin Bar Tricks

WordPress Admin Bar Tricks

According to our latest poll, so far the votes are pretty much split on whether people love, hate, or don't care about WordPress' new Admin Bar. Over time, it looks like "Hate it" has started to pull ahead, but it doesn't matter because the Admin Bar Toolbar is here to stay, regardless of opinion. Already there are many awesome ways to make it do virtually whatever you want. So that's the deal, and in this DigWP post, we round up a ton of tips, tricks, and plugins for ultimately mastering the WordPress Admin Bar.

What to do when WordPress Auto-Update Fails

What to do when WordPress Auto-Update Fails

Ahh yeah, WordPress just rolled out another update to version 3.1.1. If you're able to upgrade via the Admin, updating your site(s) should be a piece of cake: just log in, click a few buttons, wait a few minutes, and done. The convenience of automatically updating the WordPress core, plugins, and themes is awesome, but things can go wrong once in awhile and auto-updates can fail.

If this happens, getting back on track is a bit tricky, so here's a quick guide to help restore site functionality and ensure a proper WordPress update.

Poll: Love or Hate the WordPress Admin Bar

Poll: Love or Hate the WordPress Admin Bar

As most WordPress users now are aware, WordPress 3.1 includes the new Admin Bar (later renamed to the Toolbar). It's enabled by default for users of all roles and capabilities, and it provides some quick links to key Admin pages. Overall it seems useful, but there have been some strong opinions on both sides of the fence. So let's get a better idea of what people think and put it to a vote:

Hosting Client Sites on a WordPress Network

Hosting Client Sites on a WordPress Network

Regular updates keep WordPress secure and expand the feature set, ensuring the platform meets both the developer’s and their client’s needs.

The flipside of regular updates is the maintenance of WordPress installs. Once you start maintaining more than a few installs for your clients, keeping both plugins and WordPress up to date can become a bit repetitive.

Should Clients Update Their Own Sites?

Should Clients Update Their Own Sites?

A common question for new WordPress designers/developers is how to handle plugin upgrades and upgrades of WordPress itself. To illustrate the meaning behind this question, consider the following real-life example. I recently logged into a client site for maintenance to find that someone had “attempted” an upgrade of WordPress, but that it had failed:

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