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What to do when WordPress Auto-Update Fails

What to do when WordPress Auto-Update Fails

Ahh yeah, WordPress just rolled out another update to version 3.1.1. If you're able to upgrade via the Admin, updating your site(s) should be a piece of cake: just log in, click a few buttons, wait a few minutes, and done. The convenience of automatically updating the WordPress core, plugins, and themes is awesome, but things can go wrong once in awhile and auto-updates can fail.

If this happens, getting back on track is a bit tricky, so here's a quick guide to help restore site functionality and ensure a proper WordPress update.

Poll: Love or Hate the WordPress Admin Bar

Poll: Love or Hate the WordPress Admin Bar

As most WordPress users now are aware, WordPress 3.1 includes the new Admin Bar (later renamed to the Toolbar). It's enabled by default for users of all roles and capabilities, and it provides some quick links to key Admin pages. Overall it seems useful, but there have been some strong opinions on both sides of the fence. So let's get a better idea of what people think and put it to a vote:

Hosting Client Sites on a WordPress Network

Hosting Client Sites on a WordPress Network

Regular updates keep WordPress secure and expand the feature set, ensuring the platform meets both the developer’s and their client’s needs.

The flipside of regular updates is the maintenance of WordPress installs. Once you start maintaining more than a few installs for your clients, keeping both plugins and WordPress up to date can become a bit repetitive.

Should Clients Update Their Own Sites?

Should Clients Update Their Own Sites?

A common question for new WordPress designers/developers is how to handle plugin upgrades and upgrades of WordPress itself. To illustrate the meaning behind this question, consider the following real-life example. I recently logged into a client site for maintenance to find that someone had “attempted” an upgrade of WordPress, but that it had failed:

Simpler Login URL

Simpler Login URL

The default URL for logging into your WordPress powered site is: http://example.com/wp-login.php. Or if you've installed in a subdirectory, something like http://example.com/wp/wp-login.php. I've wished that was a little cleaner, especially when you are doing something explaining to a client where to log in over the phone. Fortunately changing this can be very easy.

Customize Your WordPress Dashboard

Customize Your WordPress Dashboard

There are many ways to customize the WordPress Dashboard. Over the years, the Dashboard has evolved into a highly flexible information portal, enabling an overall, big-picture view of the main components of your site, while also providing granular data on everything from recent comments and plugin updates to incoming links and WordPress news. And that’s just the default functionality, there are also a ton of dashboard widgets and plugins available in the WordPress Plugin Directory that you can use to transform your Dashboard into just about anything, or even disable it completely.

Easy Comment Management via SQL Queries

Easy Comment Management via SQL Queries

Here are some sweet SQL code snippets for easy comment management. Sometimes it’s easier to modify comment status and delete unwanted comments on a sitewide basis. Using a program like phpMyAdmin makes it so easy to do stuff like remove spam, close/open comments on old posts, enable/disable pingbacks for specific time periods, and so on. Just remember to backup your database before running any queries (just to be on the safe side).

Add Private Content to Posts via Shortcode

Add Private Content to Posts via Shortcode

Recently, WP-Mix posted an incredibly useful technique that uses a shortcode to add private content to blog posts. This functionality makes it easy to manage leftover data, miscellaneous notes and other communication by keeping everything together with its corresponding post. Consolidating information like this helps to streamline flow and organization into the future.

Poll Results: How Do You Use the WordPress Media Library?

Poll Results: How Do You Use the WordPress Media Library?

Back in January, we asked How Do You Use the WordPress Media Library?. After more than 700 votes, the results are in:

Change Quick Action Button in Admin

Change Quick Action Button in Admin

You know the "quick action" button in the WordPress admin? It's a darn useful little UI touch. At the Dashboard, the default is "New Post". But depending on where you are in the Admin, the default of it changes. In general it's really helpful. For example when you are in the Plugins area, the default is Install Plugins:

New Poll: How Do You Use the WordPress Media Library?

New Poll: How Do You Use the WordPress Media Library?

On its own, the WordPress Media Library provides users with a wide variety of great tools for managing media content. The Media Library makes it easy to upload media content such as images and video into an chronologically organized directory structure. During the upload process, WordPress automatically generates thumbnail, medium-size, and large-size versions of images. From there, users may associate individual media items with posts and create galleries of attached content.

Five Ways to Change Your WordPress Password

Five Ways to Change Your WordPress Password

With the dynamic nature of WordPress, creating, using, and maintaining strong passwords is critical. Passwords help keep the good guys in and the bad guys out, enabling you to run a safe, secure WordPress-powered website. In this DiW tutorial, we’re going to show you how to change your WordPress password in virtually any scenario: logged in, locked out, and everything in between.

Mastering WordPress Post-Revisioning and Auto-Save Features

Mastering WordPress Post-Revisioning and Auto-Save Features

Not everyone loves the post-revisioning feature of WordPress. In fact, some people can’t stand it. On the one hand, it’s nice to have a library of post-draft revisions to drudge through if you should ever make a mistake. On the other hand, multiple copies of every post is a great way to bloat your database with otherwise useless information.

Add/Remove Buttons from WordPress Write Panel

Add/Remove Buttons from WordPress Write Panel

One of the features of WordPress 2.8 was a "increased speed of the Admin area", which cited compressed JavaScript files as the reason for the speed increase. One of those files that was compressed was the file quicktags.js in the /wp-includes/js/ directory.

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