DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Category: Links

WordPress vs. ExpressionEngine: Apples and Oranges?

Marcus Neto attempts to compares the two CMSs while explaining why he likes ExpressionEngine. Are they really apples or oranges? I suppose you could say that. Apples and oranges are both popular spherical fruit. They have more in common than theyhave different. Same with the two CMSs.

While I’m 98% a WordPress guy, there are a few circumstances I might take the EE route, like when:

  1. I knew I was going to need a whole bunch of different custom data types and groups and didn’t feel like dealing with the whole Pods or Flutter setup.
  2. I also knew no newbie client was going to need to get in there.

PubSubHubbub Now On All WordPress.com sites (+ plugin for self hosted sites)

This is me trying to understand it:

Instead of services that read your feeds (e.g. Google Reader) having to ASK for your feed periodically, now they can instead just wait until YOUR SITE notifies THEM. Basically a “push” service.

It seems to me this is half the equation. The other half is building services that accept these push notifications. I’m not sure who is already doing that, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Google is on it, since it seems like a more efficient way of doing things on both sides (less server resources on both sides).

Two concerns I can think of:

  1. Is this just as reliable as the “old” way? People not getting feed updates because of a hiccup in the chain sucks for everyone.
  2. This makes “accidentally” hitting that publish button potentially even more embarrassing than it already can be. Like when you accidentally publish a post instead of a page.

Also check the overview slideshow here.

Add Link to Favorites Dropdown

This is basically a smarter way to handle the situation I just posted about. Using a function to manipulate the favorites dropdown instead of a core hack.

Update: (404 link removed 2014/04/29)

Use BuddyPress, Keep your Theme

If you want to use BuddyPress (a massive plugin that basically adds a social networking layer to WordPress sites, think, forums, profiles, user blogs, etc) but you’ve been hesitant to try it, now is a better time than ever.

BuddyPress 1.2 now works with stand-alone WordPress installs (before you had to use MU) and you can even keep your existing theme.

Using HTML5 elements in WordPress post content

Nicolas Gallagher:

Here are two ways to include HTML5 elements in your WordPress post content without WordPress’ wpautop function wrapping them in p tags or littering your code with line breaks…. Both ways rely on hand-coding the HTML5 markup in the WordPress editor’s HTML view.

Default Configuration Settings Via Plugin

One of the things I hear people desiring from WordPress is some kind of system for customized installations. So when you go to install a fresh copy, all the settings are how you like them (among other things).

Thomas Scholz has a sweet solution here to get us nearly there. It’s a plugin that you install, activate, and delete. All it does is reset your settings how you like them (you customize it), and delete the “dummy” post and comment.

Welcoming Two New WordPress Sites

Last night while twittering, I enjoyed the launch of two incredible new WordPress sites. First announced was WPShift, specializing in custom WordPress themes:

Our WordPress themes offer you infinite customisation: just drag and drop. Beautiful sites are now for everyone. Customisable sites are now for everyone.

Then almost immediately after the WPShift tweet, Ben Gillbanks announced his newly acquired and freshly redesigned WPVote (404 link removed 2014/05/30) site, where the WordPress community can submit and vote for their favorite WordPress posts. Think of it as way better than Digg for WordPress.

Both Alex and Ben did a tremendous job with their new sites. Congrats to both!

New Default Theme for WordPress 3.0

When 3.0 comes out, Kubrick and Classic will be dead and a new theme will be in. I don’t think it has an official name yet, but you can check it out so far by following the link. It’s currently in active development, I’ve noticed changes just in the few days I’ve been watching it.

Raises the bar, if you ask me.

WordPress Foundation

“The point of the foundation is to ensure free access, in perpetuity, to the projects we support. People and businesses may come and go, so it is important to ensure that the source code for these projects will survive beyond the current contributor base, that we may create a stable platform for web publishing for generations to come.”

Code is poetry