DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

What? No Printed Copies?

Posted by on

What's up with no more printed copies? We completely sold out of printed books a few weeks ago. We're currently looking into print-on-demand solutions to make more of the printed copies available to those who want them. The problem is that the book is over 400 pages and full color. And POD is pretty much pay-per-use type of thing, so the book would be even more expensive to print than before. So again, we’re currently looking into solutions for this, and want to ask if anyone knows of a decent, reasonably priced POD service. “Reasonably priced” because quality is important.

Blogging in Markdown

Posted by on

WordPress defaults to a WYSIWYG editor when composing a new Post. Of course WYSIWYG is a bit of a misnomer. What you "get" when you publish that post is dependent on the template and the CSS in place in the theme. In fact, WordPress doesn't even call it WYSIWYG, they call it the "Visual" editor. In fact, most editors of this nature these days go to length in telling you its a markup editor, not a WYSIWYG editor.

Joomla Beats WordPress?

Here are a few specific circumstances where elmalak feels that Jooma is better than WordPress. I understand some, disagree with others. I'm always interested in debates comparing different CMSs, but have never read anything that really nailed it. Largely I think people defend the one that they use the most and the one they feel most productive using. Hey, that's what I do.

Update: 404 link removed: http://www.elmalak.info/joomla-beats-wordpress/

Show Post Thumbnails in Feeds

Posted by on

One of the nice things about using WordPress’ new post-thumbnails feature is that they provide tons of flexibility in terms of where and how you display your post thumbnails. By design, post thumbnails are not included within post content, so they will not be displayed in your blog posts unless you call them specifically with the proper template tag:

WordPress Default CSS Styles

Posted by on

WordPress gives us full control over the presentation of our websites. We specify which classes and attributes to use in our template files, and then apply CSS using our theme’s custom stylesheet. Behind the scenes, WordPress generates its own classes and IDs, and applies them to specific HTML elements in theme files and database content. Having these default hooks available makes it super-easy to custom-style your theme’s blockquotes, post images, widget items, and much more.

Complete Guide to WordPress 3.0 Awesome New Features

Posted by on

One thing that people love about WordPress are all of the awesome new features rolled out with each new version. WordPress has come a long, long way since I first started working with it back in 2005, and the soon-to-be released version 3.0 takes WordPress’ powerful functionality even further. WordPress 3.0 is currently in public beta, so you can grab a copy and play around to see all the amazing new hotness. New features include a new default theme, custom post-types, and a spicy new menu manager. Version 3.0 will be available soon – so let’s check out some of the latest and greatest new features..

WordPress 3 Custom Taxonomies

In-depth overview from Paul Kaiser on how WordPress 3.0 is expanding and improving upon creating custom taxonomies, including how they can now be hierarchical. Most importantly Paul shows how (and why) they can be used in themes.

Prefix Everything

Andrew Nacin:

Anything you create in the global namespace has the potential to conflict with a theme, another plugin (including one you wrote), and WordPress core itself. Thus, prefix everything with a unique-enough character set. For example, all functions I write always start with “nacin_”, and I make sure that my functions are unique across all of my plugins.

In this recent post, I used some fairly generic function names like custom_css_hooks. Andrew is saying that names like that are a little too generic and that it's possible another plugin could use that same name which would be rather disastrous. Since it's totally internal anyway, I should have called it digwp_custom_css_hooks, which would be far less likely to meet a conflict.

WordPress on Microsoft

Yes, it runs WordPress on Windows and SQL Server.

Update: (404 link removed 2015/05/14)

Specify Unique CSS File Per Post

Posted by on

I'm a HUGE fan of being able to link up a CSS file on a per-page basis. I just find it extremely common that a page needs CSS styling unique to it, and I hate litering a sites main stylesheet with customizations that only one particular page needs. We've talked about this before, and even created a custom method for doing so, as well as mentioned the art direction plugin, which makes this easily possible.

Add Private Content to Posts via Shortcode

Posted by on

Recently, WPRecipes posted an incredibly useful technique that uses a shortcode to add private content to blog posts. This functionality makes it easy to manage leftover data, miscellaneous notes and other communication by keeping everything together with its corresponding post. Consolidating information like this helps to streamline flow and organization into the future.

Code is poetry