DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Category: Plugins

Blogging in Markdown

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WordPress defaults to a WYSIWYG editor when composing a new Post. Of course WYSIWYG is a bit of a misnomer. What you "get" when you publish that post is dependent on the template and the CSS in place in the theme. In fact, WordPress doesn't even call it WYSIWYG, they call it the "Visual" editor. In fact, most editors of this nature these days go to length in telling you its a markup editor, not a WYSIWYG editor.

WordPress JSON API Plugin

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WordPress already kind of has an XML API. Basically, RSS feeds. WordPress creates feeds for all kinds of stuff: recent posts, comment threads on any Page or Post that has comments, category-specific, tag-specific, and more. The codex covers all this and we've also covered creating your own unique feeds that could literally be from any data in your WordPress database.

wpSEO vs. All-In-One SEO Pack

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The most popular SEO plugin for WordPress is certainly the All-In-One SEO Pack. It's on just about every plugin roundup you'll ever see. It's free. It works well. But it's not the only kid on the block. One of the guys from WP Engineer has a competing product: wpSEO. I've now used them both. I thought a head-to-head comparison would be useful for people to see.

How to Add Your Plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory

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Getting your plugins listed in the official WordPress Plugin Directory is considered a chore by many, but it’s nothing that should stop you from sharing your plugin with the community at large. Up until now, I haven’t really bothered with adding my plugin collection to the Directory, but after Herb Goodman (404 link removed 2015/04/06) helped to package my recent Block Bad Queries plugin, I figured now was a good time to dig in and learn the ropes. It turns out the process only took about an hour to complete, not including the waiting period for access to the Subversion Repository (which was about 18 hours). Definitely worth the potential exposure provided by having your plugin listed in the official directory.

Feature/Bury Comments

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In my WordPress Wishes post, I mentioned something I thought would be cool: the ability to "feature" or "bury" comments. This would be very simple, just a few extra links when viewing the comment moderation list in the Admin area. The result would just be extra CSS class names applied when the comments list is output. Utkarsh Kukreti came to the rescue! Here is his announcement post (404 link removed 2015/01/14) and the plugin in the repository.

WordPress Wishes

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Happy New Year all! I'm looking forward to what will hopefully be an awesome year, with WordPress and otherwise. I thought I'd take the opportunity to wish-o-wish upon a star and toss out some things I think would be really cool to see happen in the WordPress world.

You Don’t Need Any Plugins to Stop Comment Spam

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I think one of the biggest WordPress myths is that you need a bunch of plugins to control comment spam. Pretty much all of the posts out there on preventing WordPress comment spam are telling you to install some list of “must-have” anti-spam plugins. Some authors insist that you need only a few “choice” plugins, while others advise you to load up on everything you can get your hands on. Such advice is all well-intentioned, I’m sure, but it’s all based on the assumption that plugins are actually necessary to control comment spam. They’re not. WordPress is well-equipped to handle the job all by itself. Plugins may provide additional anti-spam functionality, but they are by no means essential to running a spam-free site.

New Poll: How Many Plugins do You Use?

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Time for a new poll! This one is something that many WordPress developers and designers think about: how many plugins is the right number of plugins? Of course there is no one correct answer, but it will be interesting to see if there is a particular number of plugins that most people are using.

Rude Things Plugins Can Do

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I heart plugin authors. Their work is generally amazing, a huge benefit to the community, the reason why WordPress rules so much, and deserving of much worship. That being said, plugins can do some pretty rude things sometimes...

Code is poetry