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Posts categorized: Plugins

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Blogging in Markdown

Blogging in Markdown

WordPress defaults to a WYSIWYG editor when composing a new Post. Of course WYSIWYG is a bit of a misnomer. What you "get" when you publish that post is dependent on the template and the CSS in place in the theme. In fact, WordPress doesn't even call it WYSIWYG, they call it the "Visual" editor. And to go further, most editors of this nature these days go to length in telling you its a markup editor, not an actual WYSIWYG editor.

WordPress JSON API Plugin

WordPress JSON API Plugin

WordPress already kind of has an XML API. Basically, RSS feeds. WordPress creates feeds for all kinds of stuff: recent posts, comment threads on any Page or Post that has comments, category-specific, tag-specific, and more. The codex covers all this and we've also covered creating your own unique feeds that could literally be from any data in your WordPress database.

wpSEO vs. All-In-One SEO Pack

wpSEO vs. All-In-One SEO Pack

The most popular SEO plugin for WordPress is certainly the All-In-One SEO Pack. It's on just about every plugin roundup you'll ever see. It's free. It works well. But it's not the only kid on the block. One of the guys from WP Engineer has a competing product: wpSEO. I've now used them both. I thought a head-to-head comparison would be useful for people to make their own decisions.

Nice Way to Encourage Plugin Upgrading

Nice Way to Encourage Plugin Upgrading

A while back we talked about upgrading plugins. Specifically the All-in-One SEO pack and the controversy surrounding how it turns it self off after (some) updates. This is what that plugin looks like when it needs an updating:

How to Add Your Plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory

How to Add Your Plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory

Getting your plugins listed in the official WordPress Plugin Directory is considered a chore by many, but it's nothing that should stop you from sharing your plugin with the community at large. Up until now, I haven’t really bothered with adding my plugin collection to the Directory, but after Herb Goodman helped to package my recent Block Bad Queries plugin, I figured now was a good time to dig in and learn the ropes. It turns out the process only took about an hour to complete, not including the waiting period for access to the Subversion Repository (which was about 18 hours). Definitely worth the potential exposure provided by having your plugin listed in the official directory.

Poll Results: How Many Plugins do You Use?

Poll Results: How Many Plugins do You Use?

Back in October, we asked the WordPress community How Many Plugins do You Use?. Several months later, over 1300 people have voted, and here are the results:

Feature/Bury Comments

Feature/Bury Comments

In my WordPress Wishes post, I mentioned something I thought would be cool: the ability to "feature" or "bury" comments. This would be very simple, just a few extra links when viewing the comment moderation list in the Admin area.

The result would just be extra CSS class names applied when the comments list is output. Utkarsh Kukreti came to the rescue! Here is his announcement post and the plugin in the repository.

Why All-In-One SEO Deactivates

Why All-In-One SEO Deactivates

In the past I've been pretty pissy about the All-In-One SEO plugin from Michael Torbert automatically deactivating itself after updates. My reasoning:

1) If you update and forget to re-activate (somewhat hard to do since it reminds the shit out of you on every page of the admin), it could cause problems.

2) We are forced to see Michael's large promotional/donation blocks up in our faces above where we can reactivate. I'm all for plugin authors making as much money as they can, but this seemed to me a bit too far.

3) I really like the plugin and use it on all my sites and wish it was closer to my version of perfect.

WordPress Wishes

WordPress Wishes

Happy New Year all! I'm looking forward to what will hopefully be an awesome year, with WordPress and otherwise. I thought I'd take the opportunity to wish-o-wish upon a star and toss out some things I think would be really cool to see happen in the exciting world of WordPress.

You Don’t Need Any Plugins to Stop Comment Spam

You Don’t Need Any Plugins to Stop Comment Spam

I think one of the biggest WordPress myths is that you need a bunch of plugins to control comment spam. Pretty much all of the posts out there on preventing WordPress comment spam are telling you to install some list of “must-have” anti-spam plugins. Some authors insist that you need only a few “choice” plugins, while others advise you to load up on everything you can get your hands on. Such advice is all well-intentioned, I’m sure, but it’s all based on the assumption that plugins are actually necessary to control comment spam. They’re not. WordPress is well-equipped to handle the job all by itself. Plugins may provide additional anti-spam functionality, but they are by no means essential to running a spam-free site.

New Poll: How Many Plugins do You Use?

New Poll: How Many Plugins do You Use?

Time for a new poll! This one is something that many WordPress developers and designers think about: how many plugins is the right number of plugins?

Of course there is no one correct answer, but it will be interesting to see if there is a particular number of plugins that most people are using.

Plugin Wishes Come True

Plugin Wishes Come True

Just a quick update to the post I wrote about plugins I'm too lazy to write. Steve Whiteley put together a plugin for Subtitles that is exactly how I envisioned it. For my wishes about avoiding widows in post titles, Shaun Inman had the solution years ago. (Shaun's site is down for me right now, but I'm sure won't be for long).

Rude Things Plugins Can Do

Rude Things Plugins Can Do

I heart plugin authors. Their work is generally amazing, a huge benefit to the community, the reason why WordPress rules so much, and deserving of much worship. That being said, plugins can do some pretty rude things sometimes...

Poll Results: Goodbye Dolly

Poll Results: Goodbye Dolly

Back in July, we asked the WordPress community whether or not the Hello Dolly plugin should be included with WordPress. Several months later, over 1,200 people have voted, and here are the results:

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