DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Author: Chris Coyier

BLANK WordPress Theme

Posted by on

There are many like it, but this one is mine.

I have a “blank” WordPress theme for myself, because I make a lot of WordPress themes. Starting from Kubrick, or any other pre-made theme, would be absurd. There is to much stuff there that would to be stripped out or fought against to be useful. So, I have my own. It’s been in a folder called BLANK-theme on my computer for a while, so I’m going to call it BLANK. And now I’m making it available for you. Read on to find out the scoop on it and you can decide if it would be of any use to you.

Default Configuration Settings Via Plugin

One of the things I hear people desiring from WordPress is some kind of system for customized installations. So when you go to install a fresh copy, all the settings are how you like them (among other things).

Thomas Scholz has a sweet solution here to get us nearly there. It’s a plugin that you install, activate, and delete. All it does is reset your settings how you like them (you customize it), and delete the “dummy” post and comment.

Remove Private/Protected from Post Titles

Posted by on

I had the situation come up where I need a password-protected post in WordPress. Of course that is super easy in WordPress, you can set up a password for it right in the “Publish” box before publishing. But by default, WordPress appends “Protected: ” to the front of the post title, before and after the password has been entered. I didn’t like that, and thought that the password box was clue enough that the material was password protected.

New Default Theme for WordPress 3.0

When 3.0 comes out, Kubrick and Classic will be dead and a new theme will be in. I don’t think it has an official name yet, but you can check it out so far by following the link. It’s currently in active development, I’ve noticed changes just in the few days I’ve been watching it.

Raises the bar, if you ask me.

Leave Comments Open Forever on Specific Categories or Page Templates

Posted by on

I like the idea of shutting off comments after a certain number of days. Here on Digging Into WordPress we do it after 90. After that kind of time, the “community” of the discussion is long over. I think a good practice for turning off comments is to instead leave a message informing visitors that the comment thread is closed, and offer a course of action in case they have something of grave importance to share.

WordPress Foundation

“The point of the foundation is to ensure free access, in perpetuity, to the projects we support. People and businesses may come and go, so it is important to ensure that the source code for these projects will survive beyond the current contributor base, that we may create a stable platform for web publishing for generations to come.”

Code is poetry