DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Author: Chris Coyier

Using Google Custom Search in WordPress

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Once a WordPress powered site starts getting quite a bit of content, the default built-in search becomes fairly useless. It just isn’t very smart. If you wrote a comprehensive article about He-Man, but since have written five other articles that just mentioned He-Man in passing, a search for “He-Man” will turn up your comprehensive article sixth. There have been various tweaks and plugins and whatnot to try and make this better. But why not leverage the best search engine ever written instead?

WordPress Snippets

New WordPress-only snippets repository. Nice clean design, good functionality, quality content (like this gem). This one should be a winner. Update (2013/08/29): 404 link removed (http://wp-snippets.com/highlight-search-result/).

Custom Tweet Button for WordPress

Nicolas Gallagher:

How to create a custom Tweet Button for WordPress using the bit.ly and Twitter APIs. The HTML and CSS is completely customisable and there is no need for JavaScript. PHP is used to automatically shorten and cache the URL of a post, fetch and cache the number of retweets, and populate the query string parameters in the link to Twitter.

URL Sentences in WordPress

WPCandy is back under Ryan Imel and it’s been loaded with good stuff lately, including this great run-through of how to use Chris Shiflett’s URL sentences idea in WordPress.

digwp.com/thinks/this-is-a-cool-idea

Delay Loading of Print CSS

Peter Wilson walks us through making sure print stylesheets are loaded after the rest of the page is loaded, so they don’t hold up page rendering.

Digg Technical Talks – Rasmus Lerdorf

Pardon my ignorance here, but Rasmus starts talking about latency and concurrent requests about 16:30. He then mentions “one line of code” installation of something that sounds like “aqua code cache” that gives WordPress a 3x performance boost in response time / number of transactions per second. Anyone knows what he’s talking about there, shoot a note and I’ll update this permalink with the info. He goes on to talk about much more hardcore-PHP-nerd WordPress optimization stuff.

The scoop via Joost Schuur:
Rasmus is talking about an ‘opcode cache’. It essentially caches the parsed PHP scripts in memory. That means PHP doesn’t have to read it from disk or even convert the humanly readable PHP script code into executable machine code (opcode). The one he’s referring to is APC, which is likely going to be included in the next big release of PHP. Xcache is another popular kind. I run it on my site and got about a 3x performance increase on page request server times, so the numbers add up. The W3 Total Cache WordPress plugin has the option of using Xache or APC to keep popular pages in memory via opcode caching.

WordPress E-Junkie Plugin

We use E-Junkie ourselves on this site to sell the book. This plugin brings to two together to theoretically make that process easier.

Thumbnail Based Archives

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Here at Digging Into WordPress, we’ve attached thumbnail images to every single (non-link-style) post since day one. We started before WordPress 3.0 had the specific feature for thumbnails. We did it just by attaching a file path to the thumbnail image as a custom field. We clearly display each of those thumbnails in the design of the homepage and other various pages where it makes sense.

Code is poetry