by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Tag: tricks

Global Custom Fields

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UPDATE: Make sure to take out "Take Two" on this concept, with a cleaner method for doing this.

Custom fields allow us to attach data to Posts or Pages that we can yank out and use at will in our templates. They are awesomely flexible and single-handedly allow WordPress to be used for about any CMS need. The fact that they can only be used on single Posts can be limiting in some circumstances. Sometimes you wish you could grab a custom value that you can control and is consistent globally, regardless of the current post. In this post we'll look at a technique to do so.

Embed an MP3 Widget of Any Song (Legally)

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Let's say you were going to start a music review site where you review individual songs. Words are great, but in this context they aren't going to mean much unless you have the song right there to go with it that can be listened to. This presents some interesting legal problems. You can't just upload your own copy of the song to your web server and use some kind of MP3 player on your website to present the song. That is illegal distribution of the MP3 that could get you into trouble.

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

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Recently, I found myself on the front lines of WordPress’ somewhat complicated Media-Library system. The site that I was developing required a rather elaborate system of retrieving and displaying image attachments. So, using the latest version of WordPress (2.8.3 at the time), I found myself experimenting with as many template tags and custom functions as I could find. After much experimentation, I discovered the perfect solution, and along the way I collected a healthy collection of recipes for displaying image attachments and their various types of associated information.

Show Off Your WordPress Database Statistics

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Did you know that WordPress makes it super-easy to display some basic statistics about your database performance? The information may be displayed publicly on your web page, slightly hidden in your source code, or entirely private so only you can see it. There are two basic statistics that are drop-dead easy to include on your pages:

Getting More Fine-Grained with Includes

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I was recently putting together a site where I found it very useful to have a number of small areas of the site as separate chunks of code I could include in templates at will. The site wasn't unusual at all, it just never occurred to me to get this fine-grained with includes before, but I'm starting to do it now and I like it.

Move Your WordPress Files Out of the Root Directory

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I usually recommend that people install WordPress at the root directory of their sites. Even if you intend to mostly use WordPress for a blog, and run it at /blog/, you can still do that with WordPress at the root through some simple settings. But just because WordPress is installed and controlling your site from the root, doesn't mean that the WordPress core files need to be located at the root.

Making an Expanding Code Box

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On blogs that like to share snippets of code like this one, it is common to use the <pre> tag to wrap the code so that the spacing/indenting is maintained and long lines do not wrap. While this is desirable behavior, it can be undesirable to have those un-wrapped lines break out of their containers awkwardly and overlap other content.

Optimize WordPress Performance with the wp-config.php File

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As you may recall, there are a ton of configuration tricks available for the WordPress wp-config.php file. So many in fact, that I think many people may have missed some of the choice definitions aimed at optimizing WordPress performance. In this post, we’ll explore the best ways to improve your site’s performance with WordPress’ wp-config.php file.

Code is poetry