DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Tag: tips

WordPress Tip: Remove nofollow Attributes from Post Content

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If you have posts that include the nofollow attribute on links, you may at some point decide to remove them. By default, WordPress doesn’t insert nofollow attributes in post content, but there are a variety of plugins that will insert nofollow into all links in post content. Or perhaps you have been manually adding nofollow tags to your post links for SEO purposes. Regardless of how they got there, it’s very easy to clean things up and remove all nofollow attributes from post content.

WordPress “more” Tag Tricks

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Our personal collection of useful ways to customize and format the WordPress more tag…

Everyone who has been using WordPress for any length of time should be familiar with the < !--more--> tag. When you are writing a post, inserting the < !--more--> tag within the post text will create an excerpt out of any text/markup that precedes it. The post will then show the default “more…” link that readers may click to view the entire post. When the more tag is used, the post’s excerpt will be displayed on all non-single views, such as category, tag, and archive views; the entire post content will only be displayed when the single-post view is displayed. Let’s look at a quick example..

How to Develop WordPress Themes Behind the Scenes

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A reader recently asked about how to develop a theme on a live site such that:

  • All visitors will see the current theme
  • Only the designer will see the new theme
  • All site plugins will work with the new theme
  • Smooth transition between old and new theme at launch

These are the main concerns, but there are a few other details that need addressed to ensure smooth theme development on a live site. Let’s take a look at how to achieve these goals and effectively develop themes behind the scenes..

Two Ways to Limit the Number of Posts without a Plugin

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Let’s say your blog is set to display ten posts per page, as specified via the WordPress Admin under Settings > Reading. Once set, ten posts will appear on your home page, archive pages, search results, and so on. In other words, if it isn’t a single-view page or an actual “page” page, you’re gonna get ten posts per page. It’s a global setting.

Remove Title from Blogroll

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Typically when you use one of WordPress functions to output a list of “stuff” from WordPress, you can pass a parameter to eliminate the “title” that WordPress likes to put in there by default. For example, with wp_list_categories you pass along “title_li=” with nothing after the equals sign to remove the title that normally accompanies the output. With the function to output links (e.g. blogroll), you use the function wp_list_bookmarks, but unfortunately using that same parameter the same way is ineffective at removing the title.

Five Ways to Change Your WordPress Password

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With the dynamic nature of WordPress, creating, using, and maintaining strong passwords is critical. Passwords help keep the good guys in and the bad guys out, enabling you to run a safe, secure WordPress-powered website. In this DiW tutorial, we’re going to show you how to change your WordPress password in virtually any scenario: logged in, locked out, and everything in between.

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

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Recently, I found myself on the front lines of WordPress’ somewhat complicated Media-Library system. The site that I was developing required a rather elaborate system of retrieving and displaying image attachments. So, using the latest version of WordPress (2.8.3 at the time), I found myself experimenting with as many template tags and custom functions as I could find. After much experimentation, I discovered the perfect solution, and along the way I collected a healthy collection of recipes for displaying image attachments and their various types of associated information.

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