by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Tag: tips

Remove Title from Blogroll

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Typically when you use one of WordPress functions to output a list of "stuff" from WordPress, you can pass a parameter to eliminate the "title" that WordPress likes to put in there by default. For example, with wp_list_categories you pass along "title_li=" with nothing after the equals sign to remove the title that normally accompanies the output. With the function to output links (e.g. blogroll), you use the function wp_list_bookmarks, but unfortunately using that same parameter the same way is ineffective at removing the title.

Five Ways to Change Your WordPress Password

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With the dynamic nature of WordPress, creating, using, and maintaining strong passwords is critical. Passwords help keep the good guys in and the bad guys out, enabling you to run a safe, secure WordPress-powered website. In this DiW tutorial, we’re going to show you how to change your WordPress password in virtually any scenario: logged in, locked out, and everything in between.

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

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Recently, I found myself on the front lines of WordPress’ somewhat complicated Media-Library system. The site that I was developing required a rather elaborate system of retrieving and displaying image attachments. So, using the latest version of WordPress (2.8.3 at the time), I found myself experimenting with as many template tags and custom functions as I could find. After much experimentation, I discovered the perfect solution, and along the way I collected a healthy collection of recipes for displaying image attachments and their various types of associated information.

Mastering WordPress Post-Revisioning and Auto-Save Features

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Not everyone loves the post-revisioning feature of WordPress. In fact, some people can’t stand it. On the one hand, it’s nice to have a library of post-draft revisions to drudge through if you should ever make a mistake. On the other hand, multiple copies of every post is a great way to bloat your database with otherwise useless information.

The xmlrpc.php File and Site Security

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Located in the header.php file of most WordPress themes, there is an important hook called wp_head(). This essential hook enables functions to output content to the browser in the <head></head> area of the web document 1. In newer versions of WordPress, this hook enables WordPress to output the following three lines to your theme’s <head></head> section 2:

Edit Your Options from the WordPress Admin

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Ever needed to update an option in your database without having to log into your control panel or phpMyAdmin? WordPress provides you with an easy way to view, edit and update your database options table (wp_options) by simply opening the following URL in your browser:

Code is poetry