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Include the Category ID via post_class

Include the Category ID via post_class

The default output for WordPress’ post_class template tag includes class names for just about every type of page view imaginable:

Two Ways to Limit the Number of Posts without a Plugin

Two Ways to Limit the Number of Posts without a Plugin

Let’s say your blog is set to display ten posts per page, as specified via the WordPress Admin under Settings ▸ Reading. Once set, ten posts will appear on your home page, archive pages, search results, and so on. In other words, if it isn’t a single-view page or an actual “page” page, you’re gonna get ten posts per page. It’s a global setting.

But what if you want to display different numbers of posts for different types of page views? For example, instead of showing just ten posts on your search-results pages, you may want to show a whole bunch, like maybe fifty or something. Perhaps you would also like to limit the number of posts displayed on your category archives to only five.

Remove Title from Blogroll

Remove Title from Blogroll

Typically when you use one of WordPress functions to output a list of "stuff" from WordPress, you can pass a parameter to eliminate the "title" that WordPress likes to put in there by default. For example, with wp_list_categories you pass along "title_li=" with nothing after the equals sign to remove the title that normally accompanies the output. With the function to output links (e.g. blogroll), you use the function wp_list_bookmarks, but unfortunately using that same parameter the same way is ineffective at removing the title.

Create a Custom Database Error Page in WordPress

Create a Custom Database Error Page in WordPress

As a dynamic blogging system, WordPress consists of PHP files (the WP core) that interact with a MySQL database to generate the web pages for your website. When everything is working properly, this dynamic interaction keeps WordPress humming along like a champ, but when your database crashes, WordPress can’t operate and will deliver the following message to your visitors:

How to Disable Comment Feeds for Individual Posts

How to Disable Comment Feeds for Individual Posts

By default, WordPress generates an RSS feed for the comments on every published post. Many sites take advantage of this by displaying a feed link next to the comments area. This enables visitors to subscribe to the comment thread and stay current with conversation. It's convenient, simple, and super useful. For example, a typical feed menu for many blogs includes the following items:

The Difference Between is_singular() and is_single()

The Difference Between is_singular() and is_single()

With WordPress, there are various distinct types of page views. For example, there are category-archive views, tag-archive views, author-archive views, date-archive views, single-post views, single-page views, and so forth. And of course you know that you can target single-post views in your theme template with the conditional tag, is_single():

Multiple the_date() Functions Return Empty Date

Multiple the_date() Functions Return Empty Date

Inside the loop, if you use the function the_date() to display the date the post was published, you may run into trouble. Specifically, if there are two posts published on the same day, the second one will return nothing for a date.

Precision Targeting with Custom Action Hooks

Precision Targeting with Custom Action Hooks

WordPress’ powerful action-hook system makes it possible to insert functionality at any point in your theme. Most WordPress themes include some of the built-in WordPress hooks by default. For example, most of us are aware of the two most common WordPress hooks: wp_head() and wp_footer(), which generally appear in the theme’s header and footer sections. These two hooks provide WordPress a location at which to execute various scripts and functions. For example, the wp_head() hook is where WordPress generates a variety of <link /> and <script></script> elements, among other things.

Global Custom Fields, Take Two

Global Custom Fields, Take Two

Just as I hoped, someone wrote in with a far nicer solution to my Global Custom Fields solution than I originally had. Big thanks to David Hollander for this.

Global Custom Fields

Global Custom Fields

Custom fields allow us to attach data to Posts or Pages that we can yank out and use at will in our templates. They are awesomely flexible and single-handedly allow WordPress to be used for about any CMS need. The fact that they can only be used on single Posts can be limiting in some circumstances. Sometimes you wish you could grab a custom value that you can control and is consistent globally, regardless of the current post. In this post we'll look at a technique to do so.

Easy Custom Feeds in WordPress

Easy Custom Feeds in WordPress

Now that we have seen how to setup Tumblr-style posts, it would be nice to be able to segregate the Tumblr-posts category from the main feed into its own, separate feed. This would enable readers to subscribe exclusively to the Tumblr-posts feed and maybe display it in their sidebar or something.

How to Display a Copyright as a Range of Dates

How to Display a Copyright as a Range of Dates

Technically, your work is protected under copyright “the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.” 1 Registration of your copyrighted work is not required2, but you should include a copyright notice on all published works3. So it's a good idea to display a copyright notice on all of your blog posts and pages.

Definitive Guide to WordPress Post/Page Navigation

Definitive Guide to WordPress Post/Page Navigation

There are many ways to navigate a WordPress-powered site. There are archive links, category links, page links, internal post links, single post links, admin comment links, tag links, and many other types of navigational links. When it comes to navigating sequentially through your site’s chronological archive pages, category archives, and other types of archive pages, WordPress provides several useful template tags designed to dynamically link the pages together. Likewise, for single permalink post-views, WordPress provides a set of template tags that connects the pages together in chronologically sequential fashion.

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

Awesome Image-Attachment Recipes for WordPress

Recently, I found myself on the front lines of WordPress’ somewhat complicated Media-Library system. The site that I was developing required a rather elaborate system of retrieving and displaying image attachments. So, using the latest version of WordPress (2.8.3 at the time), I found myself experimenting with as many template tags and custom functions as I could find. After much experimentation, I discovered the perfect solution, and along the way I collected a healthy collection of recipes for displaying image attachments and their various types of associated information.

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