DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

WordPress dashboard widget for PHP errors log

Steve Taylor takes PHP error-logging to the next level by making it easy for WordPress users to display the latest errors as a widget on the WordPress dashboard. Just drop the script into your functions.php file, configure a few variables, and enjoy tracking of your site’s PHP errors from your WP dashboard. Works great as-is, and looks like a great starting point for further development into plugin format.

Five Ways to Change Your WordPress Password

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With the dynamic nature of WordPress, creating, using, and maintaining strong passwords is critical. Passwords help keep the good guys in and the bad guys out, enabling you to run a safe, secure WordPress-powered website. In this DiW tutorial, we’re going to show you how to change your WordPress password in virtually any scenario: logged in, locked out, and everything in between.

Integrating Fading Button Navigation

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I was talking with Darren Hoyt recently about building a better interactive button (404 link removed 2013/11/17). The goal of the button was to provide three states: regular, hover, and active (pressed). That is standard of any good button, but we were going to integrate some fading effects into it to really making the button satisfying to interact with. Here is a demo, and now we are going to show you how to integrate it into WordPress.

Precision Targeting with Custom Action Hooks

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WordPress’ powerful action-hook system makes it possible to insert functionality at any point in your theme. Most WordPress themes include some of the built-in WordPress hooks by default. For example, most of us are aware of the two most common WordPress hooks: wp_head() and wp_footer(), which generally appear in the theme’s header and footer sections. These two hooks provide WordPress a location at which to execute various scripts and functions. For example, the wp_head() hook is where WordPress generates a variety of <link /> and <script></script> elements, among other things.

Members: WordPress Plugin

Justin Tadlock takes WordPress user-management to the next level with his new "Members" Plugin. Members improves WordPress' content-management capabilities by providing some serious "fine-grain" control over the users of your site. The plugin features many functional "components," which may be selected according to your specific needs. From editing roles and content permissions to widgets, shortcodes, and template tags, Justin's new Members plugin looks like the ideal solution for your user-management needs.

How To: Breadcrumbs in WordPress

I've always used plugins for breadcrumbs, but of course rolling your own is always appealing. Gilbert Pellegrom shows us how to do it with our own custom functions.

Create an RSS Feed from Nested Child Pages

Over on CSS-Tricks, I describe a problem I had of trying to create an RSS feed of pages that were buried two deep under a parent page. The standard query_posts can't go two levels deep with pages, or accept multiple parent pages to run the query. Instead I had to create multiple feeds from a custom template and stitch them together.

Global Custom Fields

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UPDATE: Make sure to take out "Take Two" on this concept, with a cleaner method for doing this.

Custom fields allow us to attach data to Posts or Pages that we can yank out and use at will in our templates. They are awesomely flexible and single-handedly allow WordPress to be used for about any CMS need. The fact that they can only be used on single Posts can be limiting in some circumstances. Sometimes you wish you could grab a custom value that you can control and is consistent globally, regardless of the current post. In this post we'll look at a technique to do so.

Easy Custom Feeds in WordPress

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Now that we have seen how to setup Tumblr-style posts, it would be nice to be able to segregate the Tumblr-posts category from the main feed into its own, separate feed. This would enable readers to subscribe exclusively to the Tumblr-posts feed and maybe display it in their sidebar or something. While we’re at it, it would also be cool to be able to provide readers with a full menu of feed choices, including the following:

Code is poetry