DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Category: Links

Roger Johansson on WordPress

He’s posted a bunch of good, specific, detailed articles on WordPress lately on 456 Berea St. Worth checking out.

How did WordPress win?

Totally agree:

…people feel more comfortable hacking PHP did and still to this day.

Seriously?

…if I had a dollar every time a significant and loyal TypePad and Movable Type customer confided in me that an employee of Automattic cold called them to encourage and entice them to switch to WordPress I would have quit a rich man.

My opinion:

  • Themes are just a folder with of handful of files. That’s easy to understand and play with.
  • The UI is awesome.

Update 2013/05/03: 404 link removed: http://www.majordojo.com/2011/02/how-did-wordpress-win.php

WP Candy iPhone App

I think WP Candy is really killing it lately being a great source of breaking quality WordPress news, interviews, and other articles. Now they have an iPhone app they developed in-house to bring all the content to you that way. They are rolling it out “reverse” style, where for two weeks it’s $5.99 then later it drops to $0.99, so it’s an opportunity for the community to opt-in to paying more to support the site, which is neat, especially considering their crazy no advertising policy.

MediaElements.js WordPress Plugin

MediaElements.js is an open source jQuery-based project (which I use and like) which allows you to use HTML5 video and audio in any browser all the way back to IE 6. It tests if the browser supports HTML5. If yes, it uses that. If no, it falls back to displaying the media through Silverlight or Flash. Regardless of what it uses, the UI is always consistant.

Now available as a WordPress plugin to make it even easier. Just use simple shortcodes to link up the video and specify what options you want (e.g. autoplay, fullscreen, etc).

How to Ajaxify Your WordPress Site

Without touching a line of code, you can harness the power of Ajax to boost performance, improve usability, and fill your site with win.

Lynda.com Course: Creating Custom Themes

I created a course for Lynda.com which is an 4.5 hour, in-depth step-by-step tutorial course on creating a WordPress theme from start to finish. We start from nothing and consider our clients needs and CMS capabilities, then to go Photoshop, then to HTML/CSS, then to a WordPress theme. We go a bit further talking about topics like custom fields, JavaScript, and plugins. There is a lot here! Lynda.com subscriptions start at $25/month with no long-term commitment.

Awesome WordPress Plugins to Empower Your Visitors

If you’re looking for some great plugins to bring more interactivity and user participation to your WordPress-powered site, check out my guest-post over at ProBlogger – it covers Google Search, Star Ratings, Favorite Posts, and other techniques to empower your visitors.

Splitting Up Custom Field Values

I’ve worked on sites in the past where I needed to get two values out of a custom field. For example, I was creating an eCommerce site where some products had options. The options were in a dropdown menu. Each option in the dropdown had a value for what you actually see, and then another value for how that option effected the price. When entering a custom field, I often did it like this:

WordPress Snippets

New WordPress-only snippets repository. Nice clean design, good functionality, quality content (like this gem). This one should be a winner. Update (2013/08/29): 404 link removed (http://wp-snippets.com/highlight-search-result/).

Custom Tweet Button for WordPress

Nicolas Gallagher:

How to create a custom Tweet Button for WordPress using the bit.ly and Twitter APIs. The HTML and CSS is completely customisable and there is no need for JavaScript. PHP is used to automatically shorten and cache the URL of a post, fetch and cache the number of retweets, and populate the query string parameters in the link to Twitter.

Code is poetry