DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Category: Links

WordPress Debug Theme

Sometimes you need to see what’s wrong with a WordPress install, and you need to see it fast. I’ve had a set of hacks around for a while to do that, but finally started combining it into a WordPress Debug Theme. This theme is quite simple for now, as it only does a few things, but does them quite effectively.

Visualizes for you all kinds of important data about the page you are looking at. All kinds of fun for us WordPress nerds.

WordPress dashboard widget for PHP errors log

Steve Taylor takes PHP error-logging to the next level by making it easy for WordPress users to display the latest errors as a widget on the WordPress dashboard. Just drop the script into your functions.php file, configure a few variables, and enjoy tracking of your site’s PHP errors from your WP dashboard. Works great as-is, and looks like a great starting point for further development into plugin format.

Members: WordPress Plugin

Justin Tadlock takes WordPress user-management to the next level with his new “Members” Plugin. Members improves WordPress’ content-management capabilities by providing some serious “fine-grain” control over the users of your site. The plugin features many functional “components,” which may be selected according to your specific needs. From editing roles and content permissions to widgets, shortcodes, and template tags, Justin’s new Members plugin looks like the ideal solution for your user-management needs.

How To: Breadcrumbs in WordPress

I’ve always used plugins for breadcrumbs, but of course rolling your own is always appealing. Gilbert Pellegrom shows us how to do it with our own custom functions.

Create an RSS Feed from Nested Child Pages

Over on CSS-Tricks, I describe a problem I had of trying to create an RSS feed of pages that were buried two deep under a parent page. The standard query_posts can’t go two levels deep with pages, or accept multiple parent pages to run the query. Instead I had to create multiple feeds from a custom template and stitch them together.

Including WordPress’ comment-reply.js (the right way)

Web developer and WordPress enthusiast Peter Wilson explains an improved method for including WordPress’ comment-reply.js. His method “checks if the visitor is browsing either a page or a post, if comments are open for the entry, and finally, if threaded comments are enabled. If all of these conditions are met, the JavaScript required for threaded comments is added.”

Serve IE6 Visitors the Default WordPress Theme

Nathan Rice shares an clever technique to serve your IE6 visitors the Default WordPress theme (or any theme, for that matter). He even wraps it all up into a nice plugin that you can use for your site. I think this is a good middle-ground between completely ignoring IE6 and breaking your back trying to accommodate it. You could even design an “all-purpose” theme for IE6 to streamline new site development. Drag, drop and done.

Setting Up a Simple Backup Process for WordPress

Use the WP-DB-Backup Plugin, have it send a copy to your email. This is what we do on DiW and it works great. Part of security is having clean and recent copies of your data in case of failure.

Update: (404 link removed 2014/04/18)

How to Keep WordPress Secure

WordPress is like Windows, it’s a huge target so hackers are extra-motivated to exploit it.There has been a bunch of brew-ha-ha over WordPress security over the last week or so. It started off a few weeks ago with a really easy URL hack to reset the Admin’s password. That ballooned into a far nastier exploit allowing a new admin to be created who could totally hose a site. Matt Mullenweg does a little damage control here by essentially saying the best way to stay secure is to stay updated to the latest version. I wholeheartedly agree, and think that that step is just a part of a complete security breakfast (the upcoming book will have lots on security). I have probably nearly 20 WordPress sites I maintain and every single one of them was at 2.8.4. It’s so trivially easy to upgrade, It’s a no-brainer.

CMS Your WordPress with These 10 Plugins

WordPress is a CMS out of the box, but sites that are really deep in page templates and hierarchies can benefit from some help on the back end for managing them all. This roundup of plugins do just that.

Note: link removed 2013/04/21http://www.thinkdave.com/cms-your-wordpress-with-these-10-plugins/

New WordPress Search API (Plugin)

This looks promising. Runs MySQL Fulltext search, as well as integration with Google Custom Search Engine.

On the search results page you can refine your search by specifying whether to search posts, pages, and comments. You can also sort the results by relevance, date, or alphabet. The Advanced Search link leads to a form where you can specify author, categories, tags, and date range.

I haven’t tested it yet though, so I can’t officially vouche for it, but I’m really looking forward to playing with it. Built in WordPress search has sucked too hard for too long.

10 Useful WordPress Hook Hacks

Smashing Magazine with a characteristically nice set of tricks for WordPress, this time revolving around hooks. You can attach your own functions to hooks in that funny file functions.php that everyone is raving about. Neat ideas including entering default text directly into the TinyMCE Editor, and putting entire Post contents into a PHP variable.

Remember though that functions.php is theme-specific, so in my opinion should be used for things that are specific to a given theme, while content and admin things should be left to plugins.

Code is poetry