DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Author: Chris Coyier

(Meta) Conversation on Frameworks

The discussion starter post last week about WordPress theme frameworks worked nicely. I really enjoyed the comment thread that took place so I thought I’d point it back out to people who may have missed that or didn’t see it fully developed. Specific thanks to Justin Tadlock and Nathan Rice for sharing their thoughts as authors of popular frameworks.

The “Frameworks” Discussion

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I’ve never been a big fan of “theme frameworks.” I quite like hacking up WordPress myself and making it do the things I want it to do. I feel like most theme frameworks have a ton of custom functions for you to “help” in doing that kind of stuff. For example, adding a block of text to the sidebar, adjusting the layout, or building a custom menu.

Shortcode for Includes

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One thing that WordPress doesn’t have the ability to do “out-of-the-box” is do includes, in the sense of including the content of one post into the content of another post directly in the post editor. For the umpteenth time around here, shortcodes to the rescue!

Moving a WordPress Site

I did a screencast where I took a site that was working on localhost and moved it up to a live domain name. This involved moving the files, moving the database, and altering some information in the database. This is a good thing to know how to do if you are just getting into WordPress development. It is also just as relevant in moving a WordPress site from one domain to a different domain.

Blogging in Markdown

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WordPress defaults to a WYSIWYG editor when composing a new Post. Of course WYSIWYG is a bit of a misnomer. What you “get” when you publish that post is dependent on the template and the CSS in place in the theme. In fact, WordPress doesn’t even call it WYSIWYG, they call it the “Visual” editor. In fact, most editors of this nature these days go to length in telling you its a markup editor, not a WYSIWYG editor.

Joomla Beats WordPress?

Here are a few specific circumstances where elmalak feels that Jooma is better than WordPress. I understand some, disagree with others. I’m always interested in debates comparing different CMSs, but have never read anything that really nailed it. Largely I think people defend the one that they use the most and the one they feel most productive using. Hey, that’s what I do.

Update: 404 link removed: http://www.elmalak.info/joomla-beats-wordpress/

WordPress 3 Custom Taxonomies

In-depth overview from Paul Kaiser on how WordPress 3.0 is expanding and improving upon creating custom taxonomies, including how they can now be hierarchical. Most importantly Paul shows how (and why) they can be used in themes.

Prefix Everything

Andrew Nacin:

Anything you create in the global namespace has the potential to conflict with a theme, another plugin (including one you wrote), and WordPress core itself. Thus, prefix everything with a unique-enough character set. For example, all functions I write always start with “nacin_”, and I make sure that my functions are unique across all of my plugins.

In this recent post, I used some fairly generic function names like custom_css_hooks. Andrew is saying that names like that are a little too generic and that it’s possible another plugin could use that same name which would be rather disastrous. Since it’s totally internal anyway, I should have called it digwp_custom_css_hooks, which would be far less likely to meet a conflict.

Code is poetry