DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Author: Chris Coyier

New WordPress Search API (Plugin)

This looks promising. Runs MySQL Fulltext search, as well as integration with Google Custom Search Engine.

On the search results page you can refine your search by specifying whether to search posts, pages, and comments. You can also sort the results by relevance, date, or alphabet. The Advanced Search link leads to a form where you can specify author, categories, tags, and date range.

I haven’t tested it yet though, so I can’t officially vouche for it, but I’m really looking forward to playing with it. Built in WordPress search has sucked too hard for too long.

10 Useful WordPress Hook Hacks

Smashing Magazine with a characteristically nice set of tricks for WordPress, this time revolving around hooks. You can attach your own functions to hooks in that funny file functions.php that everyone is raving about. Neat ideas including entering default text directly into the TinyMCE Editor, and putting entire Post contents into a PHP variable.

Remember though that functions.php is theme-specific, so in my opinion should be used for things that are specific to a given theme, while content and admin things should be left to plugins.

Breadcrumbs in WordPress

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Breadcrumbs are such a standard design pattern these days I find it surprising there isn’t a build in WordPress function for displaying one. But no matter, that’s what plugins are for. A quick Google search brings up a couple. Yoast has one, so you know that one is pretty good. The other popular one is the NavXT plugin, which I actually used recently on a project and can fully vouch for it.

Getting More Fine-Grained with Includes

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I was recently putting together a site where I found it very useful to have a number of small areas of the site as separate chunks of code I could include in templates at will. The site wasn’t unusual at all, it just never occurred to me to get this fine-grained with includes before, but I’m starting to do it now and I like it.

Move Your WordPress Files Out of the Root Directory

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I usually recommend that people install WordPress at the root directory of their sites. Even if you intend to mostly use WordPress for a blog, and run it at /blog/, you can still do that with WordPress at the root through some simple settings. But just because WordPress is installed and controlling your site from the root, doesn’t mean that the WordPress core files need to be located at the root.

Making an Expanding Code Box

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On blogs that like to share snippets of code like this one, it is common to use the <pre> tag to wrap the code so that the spacing/indenting is maintained and long lines do not wrap. While this is desirable behavior, it can be undesirable to have those un-wrapped lines break out of their containers awkwardly and overlap other content.

Code is poetry