DiggingIntoWordPress

by Chris Coyier & Jeff Starr

Monthly archives: May 2011

Leave the Visual Editor ON

Posted by on

Just a quick reminder to anyone out there that may not know.. Enabling the Visual Editor in your User Profile settings gets you access to both Visual and HTML editors in the Write/Edit Post screen. Just click on either tab above the toolbar to toggle between modes. So you can write your posts in HTML and then jump into the Visual Editor to take advantage of the new Linking tool, which makes adding links incredibly easy.

New Book Winner!

Congratulations to Kristin Currier for winning a free printed copy of Digging into WordPress. The giveaway question this time was what’s the most interesting thing you’ve done with WordPress? Kristin replies:

I haven’t done a damned interesting thing
with WordPress at all.

So honest! You can read about what other interesting and unusual things people are (and aren’t) doing with WordPress in the comments of the announcement/giveaway post. Again, congrats to Kristin for winning – your new book is on the way! :)

New Printed Books are Here!

Posted by on

We’ve got a fresh batch of Digging into WordPress 3.1 now available in printed format. Each book is printed in full-color, with new extra-thick covers and slick spiral binding for laying it flat while reading. These features make the print edition feel really solid and durable, like you know you’re reading a well-crafted, quality book.

Quick News and Links

Just a few news items and resources worth sharing:

Create Your Own Functionality Plugin

You have two choices when adding custom functionality to your WordPress site: your theme’s functions.php file, or a plugin. Ryan Imel reminds us that theme-specific functionality belongs in your functions.php file (like registering a sidebar) whereas site-specific functionality belongs in a plugin (like registering custom taxonomies), as well as teaches us how.

4 Ways to Loop with WordPress

Posted by on

At the heart of the WordPress theme template is the venerable WordPress loop. When you’re looking at your index.php file, for example, the loop is the part that typically begins with if(have_posts()) and contains all the tags and markup used to generate the page. The default loop works perfectly well for most single-loop themes, but for more advanced designs with stuff like multiple and custom loops, more looping power is needed. Fortunately, WordPress provides plenty of flexibility with four ways to loop:

Code is poetry